Monthly Archives: August 2011

Some Favorite Photos

Some Favorite Photos

Testing EA’s Origin

Testing EA’s Origin

I’ll admit, I’m not too fond on change in my gaming world… I’m not among the first to get a new console and will very rarely get an anticipated game right at launch time. However, with the upcoming release of Battlefield 3–a game I WOULD be interested in getting at launch–I’ve accepted the fact that Electronic Arts is going to force us to use Origin one way or another.

I decided to exercise some caution and avoid origin for when concerns about privacy came up, but since EA changed the EULA, I was satisfied that I wasn’t welcoming an Orwellian nightmare onto my hard drive. I embarked on a quest to install Origin and see what it had to offer.

I ran into a few problems during the whole process, which I will readily admit has nothing to do with EA and everything to do with my own impatience. I somehow missed the big, shiny download button and downloaded the client in an odd, round about way. When I logged in for the first time, I somehow overlooked the menu that says “activate a product” and thought the only way to do it was through EA’s activation page. I was ready and willing to write a scathing account about having the close the program to add a game, but it’s my own fault I didn’t see it. I’m just too used to being babied by Steam.

After realizing my foolish, round about way of getting running with Origin, I’m only left with one gripe. I would really like to be able to add my entire library of EA titles. I’ve been an ardent Battlefield player since the days of 1942. I’d love to add all my Need For Speed titles. I’d probably play a TON of older Command and Conquer titles if I could only add them. But unfortunately the cut-off point seems to be from 2009. I mean, why would I want to throw down $20 on the complete Battlefield 2 series when I have the discs and their keys in the drawer next to me?

In the end, however, Origin doesn’t seem to be as bad as the internet bogey men in gaming circles would have you believe. It seems to be rough in some spots, but it’s nowhere near as rough as Steam was when it was forced onto players of Half-Life 2. I have to wonder just how successful Origin will be since Steam has a huge market share, a thriving community and a HUGE library of games. As free market economists would point out, competition can create benefits from consumers, so hopefully the big winner out of the debut of Origin will be us gamers.